The Growing Importance Of Data Privacy & Its Value To Businesses

Data privacy is a bigger issue now than ever before for both companies and consumers, as a hacker attack occurs once every 39 seconds. A lot of private information is stored online and in the company’s databases, so a data breach can lead to serious issues for consumers and businesses alike.

Data is a vital asset for any business, so the privacy of data needs to be taken seriously. If you want to learn about it in a broader sense, Prolifics explains it in great detail.

But for now, let’s focus on the value and the growing importance that data has for your business.

Why Is Data Privacy So Important For Your Business?

Without proper protocols in place, your business probably wouldn’t be able to survive for long. There are many reasons why data privacy should be a concern for all businesses and why its importance is so great. However, the four reasons listed below stand above the rest.

1. Preventing Data Breaches

With the threat of data breaches rising every day, organizations need to have strong security safeguards in place. The main goal is to protect customers’ personal data. As soon as you have those safeguards, the chances of security incidents that lead to data breaches will decrease significantly.

2. Complying With Regulations

Organizations that don’t have a way to ensure privacy protections aren’t just irresponsible, they also break the law. There are requirements that state organizations that fail to comply with laws and regulations regarding data privacy may face monetary fines as high as tens of millions of dollars. Furthermore, non-compliance with these laws can result in up to 20-year penalties.

3. Supporting Ethics

Most organizations follow an established code of ethics, and even if they don’t, they have to follow certain ethical practices if they want their business to succeed. One of these ethical policies usually states that all confidential information a customer has shared with the company needs to be handled responsibly. This means that this information can only be used for business purposes and must never be used in a way that might harm the customer.

4. Maintaining Customer Loyalty

Customers want to know their personal information is safe and that companies do everything to keep their data private. A large number of customers will stop doing business with a company in the case of a significant personal data leak and they will simply switch to a competitor.

How To Solve Challenges Created By Data Privacy Regulations

Data privacy regulations come with some challenges. While they can sometimes be hard to deal with, all you need to do is learn how to approach this issue.

Implementing Data Privacy

Data privacy touches on multiple parts of every business. Unfortunately, most companies tack data privacy to their IT security plan and think that’s enough, but it certainly isn’t. This shows that you only see data privacy as an afterthought and don’t take it seriously enough.

To implement data privacy the right way, it needs to be at the center of your data strategy and all staff members need to be trained in it.

Find A Way To Manage Access Control

A large number of data privacy breaches are caused by access control that wasn’t properly managed within a company. Keep in mind that technology isn’t the only thing you need to worry about, people and processes also matter.

Unfortunately, human employees can pose a threat to data privacy, especially within an organization that has a lot of employees, as this makes it harder to manage user access. To solve this issue, you need to have strong data governance processes as well as good data architecture.

Don’t Store More Data Than Necessary

When big data first appeared, there was a lot of hype surrounding it and many organizations believed that because they can store a lot of data, they should collect as much data as possible. However, when you think about the implications this could have, you’ll realize why this is a bad idea.

Don’t keep data just for the sake of keeping it because this broadens the surfaces hackers can target and steal data from. Instead, make a good balance between the value of collecting and storing large quantities of data on one hand and meeting compliance and security regulations on the other.

Learn To Differentiate Between Types Of Data

Not all data is created equal and some types of it need to have better security than others. You need to discover and classify all data so you can be sure where it’s located and how sensitive it is. This will allow you to treat all data uniquely.

Manage Data On All Devices

There are a lot of factors you need to consider that can make data privacy harder to control. One of those things is multiple types of devices, especially in organizations where employees are allowed to bring their own devices to work.

If you have this kind of policy, either re-think it or make sure that all devices employees use comply with data privacy regulations.

Wrap-Up

Data privacy has been an ongoing issue for years, and it will continue to cause problems for organizations that don’t take it seriously enough. However, if you carefully consider everything you just read, you can ensure that your organization is safe, trustworthy, and follows all regulations.

 

 

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The post The Growing Importance Of Data Privacy & Its Value To Businesses appeared first on StartUs Magazine.

StartUs Magazine

Permutive raises $18.5M to help publishers target ads in a new privacy landscape

Permutive is announcing that it has raised $ 18.5 million in Series B funding, as the London-based startup works to help online publishers make money in a changing privacy landscape.

CEO Joe Root, who co-founded the company with CTO Tim Spratt, noted that publishers are facing increasing regulation while web browsers are phasing out support for third-party cookies — all good news for privacy advocates, but with a real downside for publisher ad revenue (blocking cookies causes an average 52% decline in ad revenue, according to a Google study last year).

Permutive tries to address this issues by allowing publishers to utilize their own first-party data more effectively.  Root estimated that without cookies, web visitors break down to 10% who are logged in and authenticated, while 90% are anonymous, and he said, “We use the insight and understanding from that 10% to make predictions about that 90%.”

So from a single anonymous pageview, Permutive can collect 20 or 30 data points about visitor behavior, which it then uses to try to project who that visitor might be and what they might be interested in. Root also noted that the company’s technology relies on edge computing, allowing it to process data more quickly, which is crucial for publishers who may only have a few seconds in which to show a visitor an ad.

If you’re wondering whether this approach has any privacy or regulatory implications of its own, Root suggested Permutive spends “a lot of time making sure we are ideologically aligned with [European privacy regulation] GDPR and ideologically aligned with the browsers.”

Joe Root - Permutive

Joe Root – Permutive

For one thing, “We don’t believe data should be portable across applications,” which is why Permutive is focused on helping publishers use their own data. For another, Root said Permutive is committed to “the destruction of identity in the adtech ecosystem.”

“Using data isn’t a problem — it’s when you attach data to an identity,” he added. So without identity, “Instead of saying, ‘Here is an ad for Anthony, look up everything you know from Anthony,’ we say, ‘Here is an ad for a user interested in tech media.’ One model leaks data and the other doesn’t.”

Root also suggested that these shifts will allow ad dollars to move back to the premium publishers who have more engagement with and data from their readers — publishers who he argued have “up until now funded the long tail” with their cookie-based data.

This approach is reflected in the publishers Permutive already works with, including BuzzFeed, Penske, The Financial Times, The Guardian, Business Insider, The Daily Telegraph, The Economist, Bell Media, News UK and MailOnline.

Founded in 2014, Permutive previously raised $ 11.5 million, according to Crunchbase. The Series B was led by Octopus Ventures with participation from EQT Ventures and previous investors.

“Today, Permutive is the UK category leader in its field and is beating billion-dollar global businesses on a consistent basis in trial processes,” said Will Gibbs of Octopus Ventures in a statement. “The team has hired many incredible people and is now ready to replicate the success seen in the U.K. in the U.S. Given the evolving regulatory and customer priorities, Permutive’s technology could be genuinely pioneering in its field.”

The startup is also announcing that it has hired Aly Nurmohamed (former global managing director for publisher partners at Criteo) as its general manager for publishing and Steve Francolla (former head of global publisher strategy at LiveRamp) as head of partnerships.

Startups – TechCrunch

What Is Domain Privacy Protection?

The consequences of a data breach can range from relatively harmless to potentially costly. You may already have multi-factor authentication turned on everywhere, only use strong passwords, and never click on a suspicious link.

But if you’ve ever registered a domain name, you may not be as secure as you think.

When you register a domain as a website owner, you are required to provide contact info — your phone number, email address, and mailing address. This information isn’t private by default and can be the gateway to some unfortunate outcomes with shady characters on the internet. That’s why we’re here to help you understand the measures you can take to protect yourself.

In this article, we’ll discuss domain privacy protection — what it is, why it’s worth investing in, the potential trade-offs involved, and how to enable it. Let’s get started!

Free Private Domain Registration

We believe you should be able to control how much of your personal information is shared online. DreamHost includes WHOIS Domain Privacy at no cost for the life of your domain.

What Is Domain Name Privacy?

Domain name privacy (also called WHOIS privacy) is a service offered by domain name registrars to keep your personal contact information from being publicly displayed in the WHOIS directory. That directory is a public database of all website domain names, which includes contact details about the owner of each domain, and can be accessed by anyone.

The WHOIS directory is maintained by ICANN (Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers), the organization responsible for introducing Top-Level Domains (TLDs). ICANN requires that the following information be associated with each domain:

  • Email
  • Phone
  • Mailing address

Let’s take a look at why you’d want to keep your WHOIS information private, beyond just the fact that “it’s exposed.”

Why There’s a Need for Domain Name Privacy

Several different websites enable you to do a WHOIS lookup, including the official ICANN site. It’s easy to understand why this directory exists — having a central and public database of domain names and their owners can come in handy if there’s ever a legal dispute over ownership.

“The official ICANN lookup tool.”

More than that, however, is the accountability this system affords in cases of cybercrimes and copyright theft. Information acquired from the WHOIS database can be used to limit the malicious behavior of offenders across the internet.

Here are some of the most common ways people typically use information from the WHOIS directory:

  • To buy a domain that’s not currently available. Business owners sometimes find that the domain name that matches their unique brand has been taken. The WHOIS directory is one way to find the current owner of the domain and offer to buy it. This is particularly relevant if, for example, that person doesn’t have a live website containing their contact details.
  • For unsolicited marketing efforts. If you have a domain name, you’re probably either looking to build a website or already have one. Therefore, you can expect to receive dozens of emails from marketers offering to help you build or redesign your website.
  • For running scams. Aside from spam emails, it’s almost inevitable that you’ll receive emails from people who’d like nothing more than to scam you out of your website’s data or profits.

As you can see, there are ways that those with both good and bad intentions can use the WHOIS database. The bad will outweigh the good for most people, however, especially if you’re not a large corporation that can simply use the public address of its headquarters in its WHOIS details.

The Pros and Cons of Domain Name Privacy

At this point, let’s take a closer look at what you stand to gain or lose when you opt for domain name privacy, rather than sharing your information openly.

Pros:

  • You protect your personal contact information since all identifying details will be replaced by the domain registrar.
  • You’ll avoid some spam (meaning less work for your spam filters) and attempted scams.
  • You can mitigate the risk of having your site hacked (and your customers’ details compromised) or hijacked completely.

Cons:

  • You are sometimes charged a premium for this service, which can be anywhere between $ 10 to $ 30 (in addition to usual domain hosting fees).
  • You risk creating a false sense of security. Your protection is still not 100% guaranteed, as disreputable companies may sell your personal information.
  • Ownership of your domain name is less legitimate. The entity whose details is listed in the WHOIS database for a domain is considered its legal owner.

It’s worth noting that here at DreamHost, we offer domain privacy for free, which mitigates one of the chief disadvantages. This means that for most users, the positives of keeping their domains private will outweigh the few drawbacks.

Before moving on, we should also mention that some TLDs have special circumstances, and domain name privacy may either be attached by default or be forbidden. These include:

  • Privacy by default. Domains such as .al, .gr, .ca, .is, and .uk have varying levels of restrictions placed on them. For some, no information about the owner is disclosed, whereas for others, the owner’s home address may be hidden but not their full name.
  • Privacy is forbidden. This applies to domains like .us, .in, and .it.

So when deciding whether or not you want to make your domain private, you’ll also want to consider your TLD and find out if it has any special rules.

How to Enable Domain Name Privacy for Your Website

There is no one right answer as to whether you should or shouldn’t enable domain name privacy. It’s a recommended step for most users, but the pros and cons detailed above should also guide your decision-making process.

If you do decide to pursue domain name privacy, there are a few ways to do so:

  • Get a secondary email and P.O box. This is a costlier method than paying for domain privacy (around $ 100 on average), but it is an option. You just replace your own address with that of a P.O box and create a secondary email you don’t use for anything important (so it doesn’t matter how many spam or scam emails are sent to it).
  • Use a domain name privacy service. Entering your personal details anywhere online obviously comes with some risk, but this can be mitigated by keeping that data private. Domain registrars can replace your information with anonymous details so that only they have access to that data.

If you have a website here at DreamHost, adding domain privacy is easy!

You’ll start by visiting the Registrations page of your DreamHost control panel and using the checkbox to enable privacy for your desired domain.

The Domain Registrations page of the DreamHost control panel.

Just check “I want all my contact information private” and save your changes. That’s all you need to do!

Get Domain Protection Today

Although the WHOIS public directory has an important role to play, it is often misused for purposes such as scams and identity theft. So while you may be painstakingly keeping your personal details protected everywhere else, you might be sabotaging those efforts by leaving your details exposed in the directory. Investing in domain name privacy is a practical way to protect both you and your website’s visitors.

Want a painless process for your next domain registration? Try DreamHost for hundreds of unique TLDs, straightforward pricing, and free WHOIS Domain Privacy!

The post What Is Domain Privacy Protection? appeared first on Website Guides, Tips and Knowledge.

Website Guides, Tips and Knowledge

Cape Privacy launches data science collaboration platform with $5.06M seed investment

Cape Privacy emerged from stealth today after spending two years building a platform for data scientists to privately share encrypted data. The startup also announced $ 2.95 million in new funding and $ 2.11 million in funding it got when the business launched in 2018, for a total of $ 5.06 million raised.

Boldstart Ventures and Version One led the round, with participation from Haystack, Radical Ventures and Faktory Ventures.

Company CEO Ché Wijesinghe says that data science teams often have to deal with data sets that contain sensitive data and share data internally or externally for collaboration purposes. It creates a legal and regulatory data privacy conundrum that Cape Privacy is trying to solve.

“Cape Privacy is a collaboration platform designed to help focus on data privacy for data scientists. So the biggest challenge that people have today from a business perspective is managing privacy policies for machine learning and data science,” Wijesinghe told TechCrunch.

The product breaks down that problem into a couple of key areas. First of all it can take language from lawyers and compliance teams and convert that into code that automatically generates policies about who can see the different types of data in a given data set. What’s more, it has machine learning underpinnings so it also learns about company rules and preferences over time.

It also has a cryptographic privacy component. By wrapping the data with a cryptographic cypher, it lets teams share sensitive data in a safe way without exposing the data to people who shouldn’t be seeing it because of legal or regulatory compliance reasons.

“You can send something to a competitor as an example that’s encrypted, and they’re able to process that encrypted data without decrypting it, so they can train their model on encrypted data,” company co-founder and CTO Gavin Uhma explained.

The company closed the new round in April, which means they were raising in the middle of a pandemic, but it didn’t hurt that they had built the product already and were ready to go to market, and that Uhma and his co-founders had already built a successful startup, GoInstant, which was acquired by Salesforce in 2012. (It’s worth noting that GoInstant debuted at TechCrunch Disrupt in 2011.)

Uhma and his team brought Wijesinghe on board to build the sales and marketing team because, as a technical team, they wanted someone with go-to-market experience running the company so they could concentrate on building product.

The company has 14 employees and is already an all-remote team, so the team didn’t have to adjust at all when the pandemic hit. While it plans to keep hiring fairly limited for the foreseeable future, the company has had a diversity and inclusion plan from the start.

“You have to be intentional about about seeking diversity, so it’s something that when we sit down and map out our hiring and work with recruiters in terms of our pipeline, we really make sure that diversity is one of our objectives. You just have it as a goal, as part of your culture, and it’s something that when we see the picture of the team, we want to see diversity,” he said.

Wijesinghe adds, “As a person of color myself, I’m very sensitive to making sure that we have a very diverse team, not just from a color perspective, but a gender perspective as well.”

The company is gearing up to sell the product  and has paid pilots starting in the coming weeks.

Startups – TechCrunch

Privacy assistant Jumbo raises $8 million and releases major update

A year after its initial release, Jumbo has two important pieces of news to announce. First, the company has released a major update of its app that protects your privacy on online services. Second, the company has raised an $ 8 million Series A funding round.

If you’re not familiar with Jumbo, the app wants to fix what’s broken with online privacy today. Complicated terms of services combined customer-hostile default settings have made it really hard to understand what personal information is out there. Due to recent regulatory changes, it’s now possible to change privacy settings on many services.

While it’s possible, it doesn’t mean it’s easy. If you’ve tried to adjust your privacy settings on Facebook or LinkedIn, you know that it’s a convoluted process with a lot of sub-menus and non-descriptive text.

Similarly, social networks have been around for more than a decade. While you were comfortable sharing photos and public messages with a small group of friends ten years ago, you don’t necessarily want to leave this content accessible to hundreds or even thousands of “friends” today.

The result is an iPhone and Android app that puts you in charge of your privacy. It’s essentially a dashboard that lets you control your privacy on the web. You first connect the app to various online services and you can then control those services from Jumbo. Jumbo doesn’t limit itself to what you can do with APIs as it can mimic Javascript calls on web pages that are unaccessible to the APIs.

For instance, if you connect your Facebook account, you can remove your profile from advertising lists, delete past searches, change the visibility of posts you’re tagged in and more. On Google, you can delete your history across multiple services — web searches, Chrome history, YouTube searches, Google Map activities, location history, etc.

More fundamentally, Jumbo challenges the fact that everything should remain online forever. Conversations you had six months ago might not be relevant today, so why can’t you delete those conversations?

Jumbo lets you delete and archive old tweets, Messenger conversations and old Facebook posts. The app can regularly scan your accounts and delete everything that is older than a certain threshold — it can be a month, a year or whatever you want.

While your friends will no longer be able to see that content, Jumbo archives everything in a tab called Vault.

With today’s update, everything has been refined. The main tab has been redesigned to inform you of what Jumbo has been doing over the past week. The company now uses background notifications to perform some tasks even if you’re not launching the app every day.

The data breach monitoring has been improved. Jumbo now uses SpyCloud to tell you exactly what has been leaked in a data breach — your phone number, your email address, your password, your address, etc.

It’s also much easier to understand the settings you can change for each service thanks to simple toggles and recommendations that you can accept or ignore.

A clear business model

Jumbo’s basic features are free, but you’ll need to buy a subscription to access the most advanced features. Jumbo Plus lets you scan and archive your Instagram account, delete your Alexa voice recordings, manage your Reddit and Dropbox accounts, and track more than one email address for data breaches.

Jumbo Pro lets you manage your LinkedIn account (and you know that LinkedIn’s privacy settings are a mess). You can also track more information as part of the data breach feature — your ID, your credit card number and your social security number. It also lets you activate a tracker blocker.

This new feature in the second version of Jumbo replaces default DNS settings on your phone. All DNS requests are routed through a Jumbo-managed networking profile on your phone. If you’re trying to access a tracker, the request is blocked, if you’re trying to access some legit content, the request goes through. It works in the browser and in native apps.

You can pay what you want for Jumbo Plus, from $ 3 per month to $ 8 per month. Similarly, you can pick what you want to pay for Jumbo Pro between $ 9 per month and $ 15 per month.

You might think that you’re giving a ton of personal information to a small startup. Jumbo is well aware of that and tries to reassure its user base with radical design choices, transparency and a clear business model.

Jumbo doesn’t want to mine your data. Your archived data isn’t stored on Jumbo’s servers. It remains on your phone and optionally on your iCloud or Dropbox account as a backup.

Jumbo doesn’t even have user accounts. When you first open the app, the app assigns you with a unique ID in order to send you push notifications but that’s about it. The company has also hired companies for security audits.

“We don’t store email addresses so we don’t know why people subscribe,” Jumbo CEO Pierre Valade told me.

Profitable by 2022

Jumbo has raised an $ 8 million funding round. It had previously raised a $ 3.5 million seed round. This time, Balderton Capital is leading the round. The firm had already invested in Valade’s previous startup, Sunrise.

A lot of business angels participated in the round as well, and Jumbo is listing them all on its website. This is all about being transparent again.

Interestingly, Jumbo isn’t betting on explosive growth and eyeballs. The company says it has enough funding until February 2022. By then, the startup hopes it can attract 100,000 subscribers to reach profitability.

Startups – TechCrunch

GoDaddy’s domain privacy email buries the lede

GoDaddy customers are unlikely to understand their options.

Screenshot of GoDaddy whois privacy email

 

GoDaddy has begun sending emails to customers about changes to domain privacy.

As I wrote about on June 8, the company has started redacting personal information from Whois records. This means the Domains by Proxy service is no longer necessary for most people.

GoDaddy will give customers who pay $ 10 a year for this service a pro-rated refund or upgrade them to an enhanced domain protection service.

Here’s the email:

(Subject) Important: Upgraded protection coming to your domains.

We’re upgrading the protection for your domains to something even better, and at no additional cost to you.

We care about your privacy and the protection of your domains, so we’ll soon be upgrading them from Private Registration to Full Domain Privacy & Protection. It will include these features to protect your domains and private information:

  • Protects against active threats like domain hijackers and malicious transfers.
  • Safeguards you from honest mistakes like accidental transfer or expired credit cards.*
  • Prevents spam with private email forwarding.

The following domains are scheduled to be upgraded:

(redacted)

The best part? You don’t need to take any action at all. We’re going to take care of the upgrade for you.

Sincerely,

GoDaddy Domains Team

P.S. If you’d prefer not to upgrade, please click here to cancel your Private Registration add-on product by July 16, 2020. A refund will be issued for the remaining term of your current products.

* The expiration protection feature requires that your domains be set to automatically renew. Click here to learn more.

At best, this email buries the lede. At worst, it completely omits it. And that is that the product customers originally paid for is no longer necessary at all. If all they care about is keeping their information out of Whois then they should ask for a refund.

It’s not surprising that GoDaddy is trying push people to the new service. Whois Privacy likely generates over $ 100 million in profit for the company annually. That’s a big deal for a company that skirts around the GAPP profitability line.

Post link: GoDaddy’s domain privacy email buries the lede

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Domain Name Wire | Domain Name News

Ethyca Raises $13.5M for its Data Privacy Automation Solution That’s Like TurboTax for Data Privacy

With GDPR and the California Consumer Privacy Act marking the beginning of a shift in how we view privacy data, there is an increased need for businesses to be compliant as more regulations emerge. Ethyca’s data privacy automation platform provides developers and product teams the ability to ensure consumer data privacy throughout applications and services design. CEO and Cofounder Cillian Kieran walks us through the company’s history, the pain point it is solving, and latest funding round, which brings the total funding raised to $ 20M since 2018.
AlleyWatch

Need help with Privacy Policies and Terms & Conditions.

Hi, I have just started a travel firm based in India. I just wanted to know that is there any strict guide lines to follow to make privacy policy and Terms & Conditions or I just can impliment what I want to? And if so can anyone help me getting any context where I can reffer to.

submitted by /u/agustaon
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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

GoDaddy warns customers about theft with 3 new levels of domain privacy

GoDaddy’s new cross-sell warns about domain theft.

GoDaddy privacy options during checkout

GoDaddy warns customers about domain theft in its new checkout cross-sell.

Last week I wrote about how GoDaddy is now redacting most personal information in Whois records. People who paid for Whois Privacy now have the option of getting an improved “Full Domain Privacy” product or a pro-rated refund.

But it looks like there’s more to GoDaddy’s (NYSE: GDDY) privacy changes. The company has introduced three levels of privacy and changed some of the details of the Full product.

Basic Privacy Protection is what comes standard now. GoDaddy redacts your personal name, phone number and email address from Whois records.

Full Domain & Privacy Protection redacts your remaining information including Organization name and state/province and country.  It also adds a forwarding email address like Domains by Proxy did. Customers also get protection from accidental domain expiration and hijacking.

Ultimate Domain & Privacy Protection adds malware scans and blacklist checks. Last week, the malware scans were included in the Full service.

GoDaddy customers are no longer warned about spam when they check out. Now, GoDaddy warns them that there are 170,000 domain theft attempts a year (see picture).

While Basic is free, Full costs $ 10/year and Ultimate is $ 15/year.

One thing to keep an eye on is what happens to the expired domain market. If lots of GoDaddy customers convert to Full, their domains won’t expire when they usually would. It’s not clear how long registrants have to renew in case of an invalid credit card, but I suspect GoDaddy adds one year to the registration.

Post link: GoDaddy warns customers about theft with 3 new levels of domain privacy

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Domain Name Wire | Domain Name News

Ethyca raises $13.5M to help businesses automate data privacy and compliance

The upcoming CCPA regulations coming into effect in the U.S. have put a renewed focus on how companies online are handling the issues of data privacy and compliance. Today a startup that’s built a platform to help them navigate those waters more easily is announcing a round of funding to meet that demand.

Ethyca, which lets organisations both identify where sensitive data may be used and then provides an easy set of API tools to create permissions, reporting and analytics around it, has raised $ 13.5 million in financing after picking up a number of major companies, including some high-profile tech companies, as customers.

The crux of the issue that Ethyca is tackling is that online privacy compliance has become a critical issue, in part because of regulations, but mainly because the online world has, before anyone had a chance to blink, become a critical component of our lives, so getting things wrong can be disastrous.

“Move fast and break things sounds good on a T-shirt, but the web is effectively society infrastructure now,” explained co-founder and CEO Cillian Kieran, who hails from Ireland but now lives in New York. “If you met a bridge builder wearing a t-shirt saying that you’d panic. So despite the omnipresence of tech we don’t have the tools to deal with privacy issues. The aim here is to build safe systems, and we provide the data and data maps to do that.”

The funding comes on the back of a seed round Ethyca raised in July 2019 and brings the total raised to about $ 20 million. 

IA Ventures, Affirm and PayPal co-founder Max Levchin’s SciFi VC, CAA co-founder Michael Ovitz, Warby Parker co-founders Neil Blumenthal and Dave Gilboa, Harry’s co-founder Jeff Raider, Allbird’s co-founder Joey Zwillinge, Behance co-founder Scott Belsky, former Chief Data Scientist of the US Office of Science and Technology Policy DJ Patil, Lachy Groom and Abstract Ventures make up the long list of high-profile names and firms that are a part of this latest round, which speaks to some of the traction and attention that New York-based Ethyca has had to date.

On the enterprise side, the company works with a number of large tech businesses, including banks and some major tech companies that don’t want their names disclosed, to help them both better map personal data within their systems, as well as create better workflows for extracting that information when it’s requested either by a user, or for the purposes of reporting for data compliance regulations, or more often to make sure that when new products are being built, they take that existing personal data into account comply with data policies around it.

If it sounds odd that a tech company might need to turn to a third-party startup for privacy services, it’s not so strange. Even at big tech companies, which would have spent years and millions of dollars preparing for privacy regulations, the complexity has meant that not all use cases can be accounted for.

On the smaller end of the scale, it also has a number of well-known brands, like luggage company Away, Parachute Home and Aspire IQ, as well a number of other smaller businesses implementing its tools.

As Kieran describes it, while there are already others out there building tools to navigate data protection and privacy regulations like CCPA and GDPR in Europe (OneTrust and DataGuard being two in the startup arena that have raised big rounds), the aim of Ethyca is to build a layer that makes it quick and relatively easy to implement a compliance layer into a system.

The company has APIs but also now has introduced a self-service version of its product for smaller businesses, which he says means that “any customer can turn it on and follow the automated process in a TurboTax type of way.”

CCPA compliance can take 8-10 weeks to implement, and you often need consultants and more technical talent to get the work done and run services afterwards, he said. “Now it can be done in as little as an hour for an average midsized business.” Larger companies may take a few days, he added.

Kieran and his co-founder Miguel Burger-Calderon know first-hand about some of the issues that brands and other online businesses might face when it comes to identifying what kind of data might fall under these newer regulations, and the challenges of navigating that once you do. BrandCommerce, a previous company that the two founded, helps brands and businesses build and run D2C operations online. (You can also see, therefore, why Ethyca may have in part picked up the particular investors that it has.)

“Companies can no longer simply strive to be compliant and get by – enterprises need to think long-term and show their customers that they can be trusted with their data,” said Roger Ehrenberg of IA Ventures in a statement. “Forward-thinking companies have recognised the value of Ethyca’s product to their bottom line as you can see from looking at the growing set of blue-chip brands and technology customers so far.”

 

Startups – TechCrunch