Milan-based AppQuality nabs €3.5 million for its crowd testing platform

Italian startup AppQuality, a crowd testing platform, has announced raising 3.5 million in a round led by P101 SGR and ITA500 (the venture capital fund established by Azimut Libera and managed by P101), alongside Italian Angels for Growth (IAG), and Club Italia Investimenti 2.

Founded in 2015, AppQuality uses the power of the crowd to test apps, websites, chatbots, facebook pages, landing pages, newsletters, digital products and ADV campaigns online. Its crowd-based platform brings together a community of 14,000+ remote testers, in order to help companies build high-quality apps and websites with a stunning user experience. Impressively, the team already has major clients like Pirelli, BMW, Bending Spoons, Unicredit, Moncler, Allianz, Enel, Vodafone, Dyson, among its customers.

Created by Luca Manara (CEO), Edoardo Vannutelli and Filippo Renga, the range of testing they offer goes from Functional Testing, to Usability Testing, to Benchmark Testing to Prototype Testing. For example, a company with a strong customer interaction component could select to test chatbot or voice training testing, or a company looking to analyse their position in the market could complete a benchmark testing to find out what customers value about their product.

The funds raised will be used to speed up services, reduce cost and make them more effective than traditional testing methods. Their focus will remain on creating tools and services that detect defects and improve customer experience, expanding their community of expert testers and increase the potential of collective intelligence via effective collaboration tools. The startup also aims to expand further into European markets.

EU-Startups

Thriva raises £4M from Target in an era when at-home blood testing is more crucial than ever

Thriva emerged in 2016 as an at-home blood-testing startup allowing people to check, for instance, cholesterol levels. In the era of a pandemic, however, at-home blood testing is about to become quite a big deal, alongside the general trend toward people proactively taking control of their health.

It has secured a £4 million extension to its Series A funding round from Berlin-based VC Target Global . The investment takes Thriva’s total funding to £11 million. The investment comes from Target Global’s new Early Stage Fund II and will top up the £6 million Series A raised in 2019. Existing investors include Guinness Asset Management and Pembroke VCT.

Thriva has processed more than 115,000 at-home blood tests since 2016. Interestingly, these customers actually use the information to improve their health, with 76% of Thriva users achieving an improvement in at least one of their biomarkers between tests.

The startup has also launched personalized health plans and high-quality supplements, scaling up its partnerships with hospitals and other healthcare providers.

Founded by Hamish Grierson, Eliot Brooks and Tom Livesey, it claims to be growing 100% year-on-year and has expanded its team to 50 members in the company’s London headquarters.

In a statement Grierson said: “As the world faces unprecedented challenges posed by the coronavirus crisis, we have all been forced to view our health, and our mortality, in a new light.”

Speaking to TechCrunch he added: “While there are other at-home testing companies, we don’t see them as directly competitive. Thriva isn’t a testing company. Our at-home blood tests are an important data point but they’re just the beginning of the long-term relationships we’re creating with our customers. To deliver on our mission of putting better health in your hands, we not only help people to keep track of what’s really happening inside their bodies, we actually help them to make positive changes that they can see the effects of over time.”

Dr. Ricardo Schäfer, partner at Target Global said: “When we first met the team behind Thriva, we were immediately hooked by their mission to allow people to take health into their own hands.”

Startups – TechCrunch

[Kemtai in PR Newswire] Beta Testing Proves Successful, Kemtai Moves to Full Public Launch of Its AI Virtual Personal Trainer Web App

TEL AVIV, Israel, May 19, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Kemtai launched its AI, virtual personal trainer web app today. Home fitness enthusiasts can now improve their exercise form and performance and enjoy a more effective workout with different trainers from all over the world whenever they want.

Read more here.

The post [Kemtai in PR Newswire] Beta Testing Proves Successful, Kemtai Moves to Full Public Launch of Its AI Virtual Personal Trainer Web App appeared first on OurCrowd.

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How did you use customer discovery or other testing methods to determine when to quit?

This question is for people who practice any kind of customer discovery process, market validation, business idea testing — those early steps in the lean startup methodology.

I'm hoping to uncover some interesting stories here. I'm not looking for generic advice about Customer Discovery. There are 100 articles on the topic and plenty of startup success stories. There are even plenty of startup failure stories. But I'm looking for a very specific type of failure/learning… I want to hear about people disproving their hypotheses and successfully saving themselves the frustration and heartache of building things nobody wants.

When did you become confident that a business idea — your assumptions about a problem or your concept for a solution — were essentially invalid? How did you prove something wrong? What test did you use and what type of assumption did you disprove? Did you find a way to pivot or did you abandon the idea and move on to your next one? How could you have tested and disproven your riskiest assumptions even earlier and saved yourself even more time and resources?

Note: I'm NOT looking for stories about things like:

  • building something and not being able to sell it.
  • struggling to get investors to fund your idea.

I'm hoping to find some interesting stories by people who genuinely used customer discovery methods to determine definitively that an opportunity was bad, that there was no market/product fit — enough to move on.

Bonus Round: How did you quit? I mean that both logistically and psychologically.

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

[Intuition Robotics in The Robot Report] ElliQ beta testing shows how robots can relieve isolation for older people

People “aging in place” without regular care are particularly vulnerable to the mental and physical effects of isolation. Intuition Robotics Ltd. has designed its ElliQ “digital companion” and the “Q” artificial intelligence engine to address this challenge

Read more here.

The post [Intuition Robotics in The Robot Report] ElliQ beta testing shows how robots can relieve isolation for older people appeared first on OurCrowd.

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[Kryon in CrowdFund Insider] OurCrowd Portfolio Company Kryon Accelerates COVID-19 Testing

OurCrowd portfolio company Kryon has announced a solution in collaboration with the Information Systems and Digital Division at Clalit Health Services, the largest health service organization in Israel.

Read more here.

The post [Kryon in CrowdFund Insider] OurCrowd Portfolio Company Kryon Accelerates COVID-19 Testing appeared first on OurCrowd.

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Importance of custom domain for testing a product

Hi Friends,

I have a few product ideas I would like to test. How important do you think getting a custom domain is? Can I just use a page on my main website? How important do you think this is? Is there a way to buy a domain for 2 months or so? Or a cheap way to get a custom domain? I would like to test out several ideas, if I can avoid buying several domains, that would be ideal.

What do you think?

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

Checkly raises $2.25M seed round for its monitoring and testing platform

Checkly, a Berlin-based startup that is developing a monitoring and testing platform for DevOps teams, today announced that it has raised a $ 2.25 million seed round led by Accel. A number of angel investors, including Instana CEO Mirko Novakovic, Zeit CEO Guillermo Rauch and former Twilio CTO Ott Kaukver, also participated in this round.

The company’s SaaS platform allows developers to monitor their API endpoints and web apps — and it obviously alerts you when something goes awry. The transaction monitoring tool makes it easy to regularly test interactions with front-end websites without having to actually write any code. The test software is based on Google’s open-source Puppeteer framework and to build its commercial platform, Checkly also developed Puppeteer Recorder for creating these end-to-end testing scripts in a low-code tool that developers access through a Chrome extension.

The team believes that it’s the combination of end-to-end testing and active monitoring, as well as its focus on modern DevOps teams, that makes Checkly stand out in what is already a pretty crowded market for monitoring tools.

“As a customer in the monitoring market, I thought it had long been stuck in the 90s and I needed a tool that could support teams in JavaScript and work for all the different roles within a DevOps team. I set out to build it, quickly realizing that testing was equally important to address,” said Tim Nolet, who founded the company in 2018. “At Checkly, we’ve created a market-defining tool that our customers have been demanding, and we’ve already seen strong traction through word of mouth. We’re delighted to partner with Accel on building out our vision to become the active reliability platform for DevOps teams.”

Nolet’s co-founders are Hannes Lenke, who founded TestObject (which was later acquired by Sauce Labs), and Timo Euteneuer, who was previously Director Sales EMEA at Sauce Labs.

Tthe company says that it currently has about 125 paying customers who run about 1 million checks per day on its platform. Pricing for its services starts at $ 7 per month for individual developers, with plans for small teams starting at $ 29 per month.

Startups – TechCrunch

Tips for beta testing an app with less than 1,000 testers?

We’ve been beta testing our iOS app with a group of 15 people for a couple of months now and we’re looking to take the next step and release to a larger group. Everything has gone well with that test, so we want to expand by adding about 200 new users per month.

How do we go from working with 15 beta testers (in a very non-scaleable way) to effectively receiving feedback from 100-1,000+ beta testers?

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Startups – Rapid Growth and Innovation is in Our Very Nature!

[Perception Point in 69News] Perception Point Receives Top Overall Ranking in SE Labs Independent Testing, Achieving 96% Accuracy Rating and 0% False Positive Rate

TEL AVIV, Israel, April 7, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Perception Point, a 360-degree Prevention as a Service company offering fast interception of any content-based attack across email and all collaboration channels, today announced that it has been ranked #1 in SE Labs’ last independent testing.

Read more here.

The post [Perception Point in 69News] Perception Point Receives Top Overall Ranking in SE Labs Independent Testing, Achieving 96% Accuracy Rating and 0% False Positive Rate appeared first on OurCrowd.

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